Tuesday, April 25, 2017
Travel with smiles and without worries!

Traditional Music

Vietnam Traditional Music

Quan Ho

  • The folk-song Quan Ho, a very rich and beautiful musical storehouse of our people, hasquan_ho_300 a very long lasting history. During all its existence, successive creations have unceasingly changed the type of the folk-song Quan Ho.
  • Today, there are "Quan Ho dai", "New Quan Ho", "the renovated Quan Ho". This shows that there may be some kinds of Quan Ho that are not real Quan Ho. Thus, from what epoch has the tradition of Quan Ho dated?
  • One of the old polular tales narrates as follows: Once upon a time, Lung Giang village (Liem village) and Tam Son village (Tu Son), both in Bac Ninh province, were in very good relations. Every year, on the 13th of the first lunar month, Tam Son village held a singing party at the communal house and invited five or six elderly men and five or six elderly women together with a great number of young singers of Lung Giang to come to join them. At the festival came into being a form of dialogue. Alternately, each time the young man of one of the villages had sung, the girls from the other village would reply in singing. Such singing competitions lasted all night until the morning of the following day. However, it's asserted that only under the Ly dynasty (1009-1225) did the folk-song Quan Ho begin to develop strongly and become joyful festivals lasting as much as half a month.
  • People of ancient times narrated as follows: Although their capital had been established in Thang Long, every year at springtime the Ly Kings always returned to their native locality, Kinh Bac, to hold joyful festivals. Each time, the fleet of dragon boats of the king entered Thien Duc river (or Duong river), the kindred and officials (Quan Vien Ho) of the Ly family, including children, the elderly, young men and young girl, all stood on the two banks of the royal canal which is reserved to welcome royal dragon boats. They sang hymns of praise, claping their hands and sang songs praising the king to the rhythm of the boat's oars and to the rhythm of the castanets of the Chief Rower. The king often gave a special traditional feast, granted money, silk and opened a official sanity party who recited poems and sang. Since then on, this kind of folk-songs bears the name of Quan Ho songs, or the songs of the Officials and the Kindred.
  • Each year, on the 13th of the 1st lunar month, on the Lim hills or in the Lim pagoda's park, among the blossoming peony bushes, the pilgrims come from every corner of the country and distinguished and smart young men and young girls of the region gather for sight seeing, contemplating blossoming flowers, encountering and making acquaintance with each other and listening together to recitals of songs, or sing Quan Ho songs. travel vietnam.
  • Coming Lim festival in groups of young men or women, Quan Ho singers are dressed in their best clothes, men carry with them an umbrella of black silk, women a fan under a cartwheel palm-leaf hat tucked under their arms. A female group may be the first to go up to a male group and offer betel quids, thus striking up an acquaintance. A dialogue begins in the form of songs. In any event, courliness is the rule. The men call themselves "Your younger bothers" and address the women as " Our elder sisters"; conversely, the latter call themselves "Your younger sisiters" and address the former as" Our elder brothers". Female duets keep up the conversation by exchanging songs with male duets.

For instance, if the female group sing:

"How dare we! You elder brothers are like the moon that shines in the sky, we your younger sisters, we are but tiny lamps lighting small cottages".

The men will answer unpretentiously:

"Please be the first to sing, elder sisters, we'll follow suit".

A song sung on a certain tune must be answered on the same tune, the repertory comprising hundreds of tunes. All errors will be gently corrected. Songs can be known or brand new on known tunes. There is no accompanying instrumental music. The voice is enough to sing the joy of life, the love of the land, or to say sweet nothings which could exude merriment, nostalgia, or amusement, like this very popular song:

" To the beloved one, one gives one's shirt Back home, one will lie to father and mother: As I cross the bridge, the wind has blown it away."

The final phase is reserved for farewell songs, with such moving as: "Do stay on, friends, don't go yet!", and "Don't miss our next rendez-vous!"...

  • Noteworthy, the two groups thus twinned are linked together by fraternal or artistic affection rather than love; their member must not get married. A woman may be man's intimate friend but not his mistress. If after his marriage (to another woman) the man should pay a visit to his friend (married to another man), the woman's husband will discreetly stay away so as not to be cause for embarrassment. And, as custom would have it, children of the two couples will often strike up close friendships.
  • Saying good-bye to the festival, the Quan Ho young men and young girls return to the field where they will work hard to produce crops. But they do not forget to revise their songs and prepare new ones while awaiting the next year competition. Labour and arts have really added wings to life in the old Quan Ho villages.

Ca tru music

  • Ca tru music sounds strange to the uninitiated. Clicks and clacks accompany the centuries old ballads. It is not the kind of music that inspires toe tapping or humming.
  • Originally, ca tru was also called hat a dao or hat noi (literally song of the women singers). Attractive young singers entertained men in a relaxed environment, sometimes serving drinks and snacks. Men might have visited a hat a dao inn with friends to celebrate a successful business deal or the birth of a son.
  • Ca tru flourished in the 15th century in northern Vietnam when it was popular with the royal palace and a favorite hobby of aristocrats and scholars. Later it was performed in communal houses, inns and private homes. These performances were mostly for men. When men entered a ca tru inn they purchased bamboo tally cards. In Chinese, tru means card. Ca means song in Vietnamese, hence the name ca tru: tally card songs. The tallies were given to the singers in appreciation for the performance. After the performance each singer received payment in proportion to the number of cards received.
  • Ca tru requires at least three performers. The singer is always a woman and plays the phach, an instrument made of wood or bamboo that is beaten with two wooden sticks. A musician accompanies the singer on the dan day, a long-necked lute with three silk strings and 10 frets. There is also a drummer or trong chau.
  • The drummer shows his approval of the singer or the songs depending on how he hits the drum. If he likes a song he might hit the side of the drum several times. If he is disappointed with the singer, he hits the drum twice. The guitar player must follow the rhythm of the phach. His instrument, the dan day, is only used in ca tru and is now made almost exclusively for sale to tourists who find the shape intriguing.

Cheo opera

  • Cheo is a form of popular theatre in Vietnam that has its roots in ancient village festivals.hat_cheo
  • It consists of folk songs with pantomime, intrumental music and dances, combined with instructive or interpretive sketches dealing with stories from legends, poetry, history or even daily life. Also brought into play are acrobatic scenes and magic. Cheo tells tales of chiefs, heroes and lovely maidens and offers an eclectic mix of romance, tragedy and comedy.
  • Traditionally Cheo was composed orally by anonymous authors. Today's playwrights compose cheo operas along traditional lines : the characters in the plays sing time-tested popular melodies with words suited to modern circumstances.
  • The costomes, makeup, gestures and language create typical characters familiar to every member of the audience. The props are simple. As a result, there is a close interchange between the performers and the spectators.
  • A Cheo play could be put on stage in a large theatre, but it could also be performed successfully on one or two bed mats spread in the middle of a communal house with a cast of only three: a hero, a heroine and a clown.
  • The sound of the Cheo drum has a magical power and upon hearing it, villagers cannot resist coming to see the play. The clown in a cheo play seems to be a supporting role, but actually he or she is very important to the performance. The clowns present a comic portrayal of social life, with ridiculous, satirical words and gestures, they reduce the audience to tears of laughter.
  • The national Cheo repertoire includes among others Truong Vien, Kim Nhan, Luu Binh - Duong Le, and Quan Am Thi Kinh, which are considered treasures of the traditional stage.
  • Cheo opera is an integral part of Vietnamese theatre and is well-enjoyed by people in both country and town, and by foreign spectators as well. It is particularly relished by foreign tourists and overseas Vietnamese on a visit to their country of origin.

Cai Luong (renovated opera)

  • Cai Luong (Renovated Opera) appeared in the southern part of Vietnam in the 1920s. This relatively modern form combines drama, modeled after French comedy, and singing.
  • Scenes are elaborate and are changed frequently throughout the play. Cai luong is similar to the Western operettas and more easily depicts the inner feelings of the characters. Songs of the Cai luong are based on variations of a limited number, perhaps 20, of tunes with different tempos for particular emotions - this convention permits a composer to choose among 20 variations to express anger, and as many to portray joy.
  • The principal supporting songs in Cai Luong is the Vong Co (literally, nostalgia for the past). Cai luong owes much of its success to the sweet voices of the cast, much appreciated by the audience. Upon hearing the first bars of the well-loved Vong Co, the audience reacts with gasps of recognition and applause.
  • The Cai luong performance includes dances, songs, and music; the music originally drew its influences from southern folk music. Since then, the music of Cai luong has been enriched with hundreds of new tunes. A Cai luong orchestra consists mainly of guitars with concave frets, and danakim.
  • Over the years, Cai luong has experienced a number of changes to become a type of stage performance highly appreciated by the Vietnamese people as well as foreign
   

Special Promotion

Testimonials

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5

Support online

Trợ giúp kỹ thuật

Linkmarket system

Circuit Siem Reap
Circuit Siem Reap
Voyage combiné Laos Cambodge
Voyage combiné Laos Cambodge
Voyage Laos Cambodge pas cher
Voyage Laos Cambodge pas cher
Itinéraire Laos Cambodge
Itinéraire Laos Cambodge

Galatourist Co.,Ltd - Licence No. 0102023234

Head Office:
Add: 45, Yen Bai 1 str., Hanoi, Vietnam
Tel: (+84-4) 39766181 – Fax: (+84-4) 39766182
Mobile 24/7: (+84) 912 264 631
E-mail: info@galatourist.com
Branch:
Add: 403/521, Nguyen Trai str., Hanoi, Vietnam
Tel: (+84-4) 35573182
Mobile 24/7: (+84) 912 264 631
E-mail: info@galatourist.com
Website partner: Vietnam Tours, Voyage Vietnam